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AMC Stubs A-List Review: So Far So Great

I don’t even think the AMC Stubs A-List program is a month old yet, but I can tell you after using it for the past three weeks I’ve found it to be a fantastic value and experience. In case you’re not aware of what the A-List program is, it offers subscribers the ability to see up to three movies a week at any AMC theater location for just $19.95 a month with a minimum 3-month commitment (after that a subscriber can cancel at anytime). In contrast to MoviePass, subscribers will never be presented with blackout dates or surge pricing for popular films, and they can see a movie in any available AMC theater format, which includes IMAX, Dolby, and RealD 3D screens. You can also order tickets digitally through AMC’s app and can use e-tickets, so there is no member card to carry around, you just need your ticket and an ID to get into your screening. Finally, A-List also awards AMC rewards points for your monthly membership at a rate of 100 points per $1 spent, but if you book your screenings through A-List, you will not get rewards points for those bookings.

I’m a huge movie buff, and have shifted my free time priorities to watching new films over playing new video games, so a program like this has always made sense to me, especially when you consider that a single ticket these days can cost upwards of $16 depending on the format of the theater you see it in. I initially thought MoviePass would be the way to go, but considering I have a state-of-the-art AMC less than three miles from my house, AMC’s A-List became a no-brainer when it came out of nowhere last month. As soon as it went live I enrolled, which was very easy since I already had an AMC Premiere account. Once enrolled I downloaded the AMC app, and quickly found it to be a fantastic mobile booking experience, which cemented the good feelings I had about enrolling into this program. I’m a huge fan of Fandango’s app, and was worried that being forced to use AMC’s for A-List screenings would be a bother, but that hasn’t been the case at all, and AMC’s app may even be better for pure AMC theater bookings anyway, so any concerns I had about using the app were instantly washed away upon installation.

The process of booking your three screenings per week couldn’t be easier. Within the app you can choose a movie to see at a theater near you, or just go to your favorite saved theater and see what is playing on a particular day. Any A-List bookings will be listed on your profile page, and you can also keep tabs on your Stubs rewards, which can be used to buy tickets for people not in A-List, or for concession stand discounts and freebies, so if you’re an AMC fan the app is very functional to say the least.

Once you book a screening you can’t go over three in a week, which quite frankly is a solid number of available A-List screenings per week. In fact, if you see just two movies a month, you will pay for the full membership, so if you live near an AMC and see more than a movie a month, this program is a no-brainer. I haven’t had an issue yet, I’ve seen some of the biggest summer releases (Ant-Man and the Wasp) on opening night in the best possible seat, and I’ve been able to walk in and show my ID and ticket without a hassle. It truly has been a great experience so far, and the program has completely motivated me to get out and see more movies than I ever thought possible based on budget and life commitments.

I’ve only ran into one issue, but the logic behind it made sense. I had booked an Ant-Man screening for 9:30p, but needed to change it to an earlier screening. Out of fear of losing my spot in the 9:30 screening in case I couldn’t get a seat in the earlier screening, I left the 9:30p screening in my A-List queue. When I went to add the earlier screening to my queue it wanted to charge me full price, because the system saw that I already had a screening at 9:30 and if I went to one at 7:45 then I wouldn’t be able to see the one at 9:30 because I’d still be in the earlier screening. Like I said this makes sense logically from a programming standpoint, but it would have been nice to be warned, or have the system cancel my existing reservation after the earlier one was confirmed. Like I said, this is a special situation, and if I just had the balls to cancel the later screening before booking the earlier one I’m sure it would have worked out.

If you’ve been on the fence about this program while waiting to hear from a real person what it’s all about, I can tell you it’s time to get off that fence. Unless AMC comes in and tries to raise prices or screw with the booking process, I can’t find much wrong with the A-List program as it stands now. It’s easy to use, convenient, and value-based, so if you see more than one movie a month and live close to an AMC theater, joining A-List is a no-brainer. Head on over to get enrolled today!

I don't even think the AMC Stubs A-List program is a month old yet, but I can tell you after using it for the past three weeks I've found it to be a fantastic value and experience. In case you're not aware of what the A-List program is, it offers subscribers the ability to see up to three movies a week at any AMC theater location for just $19.95 a month with a minimum 3-month commitment (after that a subscriber can cancel at anytime). In contrast to MoviePass, subscribers will never be presented with blackout dates or surge pricing for…
If you love movies and live by an AMC, the Stubs A-List program is a value add for your life.

Review Summary

Value - 10
Ease of Use - 9.5
App - 9

9.5

ENROLL

If you love movies and live by an AMC, the Stubs A-List program is a value add for your life.

 

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Tags : AMC Theaters
Matt Heywood

The author Matt Heywood

Matt Heywood is the founder and EIC of EntertainmentBuddha.com where he strives to make you a better geek, one post at a time! When he's not scouring the Internet for interesting nuggets of awesomeness he can be found in his secret lair enjoying the latest and greatest video games, taking pictures of toys, or talking Star Wars on EB's Star Wars Time podcast show.