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If you recall, I had the opportunity to test out an early build of Beat the Game back in July. This was only a small fifteen-minute preview of what the full game was supposed to be. Unfortunately, I was wrong with thinking that the game was much longer than that small preview. Turns out, I was already a quarter of the way done with the game at that point. The full version of the game is released on Steam and can be bought and played completely through.

In the short time that it took me to complete the game, there were many things that I did enjoy. The graphics in the game just scream creativity. The art is abstract and way out there; it’s almost like a Dali painting comes to life on the computer screen.

Beat the Game, the title, sort of has two meanings in that they want you to beat the game but, at the same time, it has a lot to do with music. I didn’t notice too many graphical problems with the game as most of the graphical choices were so far out there, they just made sense. There wasn’t too much in the way of a story, though. I couldn’t really grasp what was going on.

 

An interesting side character I didn’t have the time to meet.

The point of the game is to gather sounds from around the world and create music with them. You have to collect so many sounds that you eventually put on a live show to the citizens of this world. After putting on the show, a strange car arrives with a giant head attached to it. The main character hops in this car and drives off into the distance. It is at this point where the game ends.

I was sort of left with a feeling of incompleteness as the game let me finish it without having 100% of the sounds. With it being only about an hour long, I was able to complete it twice over, still without finding all of the sounds. The art direction and sound in this game are in a style of their own—something I haven’t played in a long time. I was only disappointed in the shortness of the game and the lack of story explanation.

To me, Beat the Game is more or less an over glorified tech demo with an artistic flair!

 

“Making you a better geek, one post at a time!”

If you recall, I had the opportunity to test out an early build of Beat the Game back in July. This was only a small fifteen-minute preview of what the full game was supposed to be. Unfortunately, I was wrong with thinking that the game was much longer than that small preview. Turns out, I was already a quarter of the way done with the game at that point. The full version of the game is released on Steam and can be bought and played completely through. In the short time that it took me to complete the game, there were many things…
Beat the Game is a very short-lived, artistically driven music adventure. While there isn't much in terms of length, the game drives unique gameplay with creative artistic design. Held back by its shortness and no real story, Beat the Game is a fun game to sit down and run through.

'Beat the Game' Review Summary

Story - 4.5
Gameplay - 7.2
Graphics - 9
Sound - 9.4
Entertainment Value - 6.7

7.4

An Artful Escape!

Beat the Game is a very short-lived, artistically driven music adventure. While there isn't much in terms of length, the game drives unique gameplay with creative artistic design. Held back by its shortness and no real story, Beat the Game is a fun game to sit down and run through.

Review statement: The copy of this game was supplied by the developer for the sake of this review.

Tags : Beat the Game
Randy Ladyka

The author Randy Ladyka

Practically born with a controller in hand, Randy Ladyka is a self-proclaimed Video Game Connoisseur. Aside from fully investing himself in all things nerd, he’s currently raising three little boys and attempting to convince his wife to play anything with him. He spends 90% of his free time reading, researching and playing games and recording your next favorite gaming video. The other 10% is spent sleeping and eating, though not simultaneously.